The old switcheroo


I really don’t like being made a fool of.  Even when I deserve to be made a fool.  Subject: The Olympics coverage on NBC.  For the most part, I didn’t watch results, I recorded the nightly proceedings and filtered out what I didn’t want to watch, like 18 mile races through the snow.  Yawn.  Like, so many personal interest stories that last an hour of the 3 hour coverage.  (Don’t get me wrong, I did watch some of them, like the one about the ParaOlympic swimmer who was adopted from way out in the boonies of Russia, and wanted to go home to meet her ‘real’ parents-more on this later).

I go to be relatively early.  If work permits, I’m in bed by 9:00. Sawing logs.  My wife usually dozes off about 8.  We used to love it when we could get East Coast channels on satellite.  Now we have DVR.  It’s great for a lot of things.  I love the Julie Chu commercial for Proctor and Gamble, just don’t need to see it 150 times.  And the Verizon jingle is an-noy-ing. Also, we have set ways, like staying in touch with the world around us.  I get home about 5:30, eat, exercise, and lately, work until I’m tired with the TV on in the background, with Fox News.  Once those are over, we go to the DVR menu, and during the Olympics we were watching two or three days behind.  We have lives, you know?  I would say that, from any given 3.5 hour broadcast, we’d watch half, or less.  Skip all the Bob Costas/Mary Carullo commentary, most of the personal interest story, and some of the sports, biathalon and cross-country skiing, especially.  The other annoying thing about coverage is how they switch between sports to try and build up the suspense.  So sometimes, I’d fast forward to finish one competition, then back up to watch another.  It’s good to have DVR. Watch what you want, when you want.

I don’t know what night it actually happened, but we watched it the night before last.  They were setting up the figure skating exhibition, and it was not the commentators for the actual competitions.  It was the pretty boy who usually covers figure skating, and Tara Lipinski and Johnny Weir.  But Tara and Johnny were dressed in, basically, the same outfit.  Johnny is “gay”, you see.  They didn’t focus on them much, and went to the exhibition a couple of times during the evening, and we thought they just would let it pass without comment.  Then in the ending of the show, Bob Costas, with a smirk, teased the late-night show, where he said we’d see more of the Tara and Johnny show…

Here’s the thing.  I don’t care if you have same sex attraction issues.  I personally have opposite sex attraction issues.  I have to constantly remind myself that that girl has a mother who loves her, and I should curb my thoughts.  But I don’t broadcast my sexuality.  Oh, well, I hold hands with my wife in public, and when people see us together, they sorta know we’re together.  But when I see two girls walking down the street, I don’t automatically wonder about their sexuality.  Sexuality is a personal thing.  It’s nobody’s business but your own.  I know people who are gay, have friends who are gay, etc.  It doesn’t affect me, as long as they’re not begging me to engage in sex with them.  It bothers me that people wear their sexuality out in the open so much.  So, no, I didn’t think Johnny was cute for making the statement he did.  I thought he made an otherwise pretty good show trashy.

Now we have the news of the gay NBA player who finally came out.  It’s historic, they tell us.  The first openly gay pro athlete.  (I question that, but ok).  So what I want to know is, if another NBA star holds a press conference, and tells the world he likes women with big butts like Serena Williams, or that he’s into something kinky, what’s the world going to say?  Will they use the word “historic”.  Personally, I’d judge it to be exactly how I think of announcing your gay-ness…TMI.  Keep it to yourself, let your actions speak for themselves, if anyone’s paying attention, and leave it at that.

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