Reasons to go to (or return) to Confession


Attached is another PDF from the National Catholic Register, feel free to download and distribute.

 

Advent-Confession

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2 thoughts on “Reasons to go to (or return) to Confession

  1. If you have other questions, please ask:

    Briefly, Jesus granted the Apostles the authority to forgive sins. By virtue of apostolic succession, this authority is conferred to the bishops. The bishops authority is conferred to priests when the bishop ordains the priest. This authority is only given to priests and bishops.

    Regarding the necessity of confessing our sins:
    James 5:16 – James clearly teaches us that we must “confess our sins to one another,” not just privately to God. James 5:16 must be read in the context of James 5:14-15, which is referring to the healing power (both physical and spiritual) of the priests of the Church. Hence, when James says “therefore” in verse 16, he must be referring to the men he was writing about in verses 14 and 15 – these men are the ordained priests of the Church, to whom we must confess our sins.

    Acts 19:18 – many came to orally confess sins and divulge their sinful practices. Oral confession was the practice of the early Church just as it is today.

    Matt. 3:6; Mark 1:5 – again, this shows people confessing their sins before others as an historical practice (here to John the Baptist).

    1 Tim. 6:12 – this verse also refers to the historical practice of confessing both faith and sins in the presence of many witnesses.

    1 John 1:9 – if we confess are sins, God is faithful to us and forgives us and cleanse us. But we must confess our sins to one another.

    Num. 5:7 – this shows the historical practice of publicly confessing sins, and making public restitution.

    2 Sam. 12:14 – even though the sin is forgiven, there is punishment due for the forgiven sin. David is forgiven but his child was still taken (the consequence of his sin).

    Neh. 9:2-3 – the Israelites stood before the assembly and confessed sins publicly and interceded for each other.

    Sir. 4:26 – God tells us not to be ashamed to confess our sins, and not to try to stop the current of a river. Anyone who has experienced the sacrament of reconciliation understands the import of this verse.

    Baruch 1:14 – again, this shows that the people made confession in the house of the Lord, before the assembly.

    1 John 5:16-17; Luke 12:47-48 – there is a distinction between mortal and venial sins. This has been the teaching of the Catholic Church for 2,000 years, but, today, most Protestants no longer agree that there is such a distinction. Mortal sins lead to death and must be absolved in the sacrament of reconciliation. Venial sins do not have to be confessed to a priest, but the pious Catholic practice is to do so in order to advance in our journey to holiness.

    Matt. 5:19 – Jesus teaches that breaking the least of commandments is venial sin (the person is still saved but is least in the kingdom), versus mortal sin (the person is not saved).

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